July 6, 2017 - AsiaNet-Pakistan

Archive for July 6th, 2017

Frost & Sullivan Recognizes Gemalto for Leadership in Encryption and Data Protection

July 6, 2017 | Education

Amsterdam, July 6, 2017– Gemalto (Euronext NL0000400653 GTO), the world leader in digital security, announced today it has been awarded the Frost & Sullivan 2017 Encryption and Data Protection Technology Leadership Award1. Frost & Sullivan analysts independently evaluated Gemalto’s SafeNet data protection and encryption solutions, in particular, the commercial success, growth potential, operational efficiency, and […]

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تكريم شركة فروست أند سوليفان لشركة جيمالتو لريادتها في مجال التشفير وحماية البيانات

July 6, 2017 | Other Language, Urdu

أمستردام، 06 يوليو 2017 – أعلنت شركة جيمالتو، الرائدة على مستوى العالم في مجال الأمن الرقمي (والمدرجة في بورصة يورونيكست تحت الرمز NL0000400653 GTO)، أنها حصلت على جائزة الريادة في مجال تقنية التشفير وحماية البيانات لعام 2017 التي تمنحها شركة فروست أند سولفيان1. وقد قيَّم المحللون في شركة فروست أند سولفيان بشكل مستقل حلول SafeNet […]

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Gunmen Kill Pakistani Regional Politician, Driver in Quetta

July 6, 2017 | Entertainment

Gunmen have shot and killed a Pakistani regional political party leader in the city of Quetta, police in the southwestern province of Balochistan say.Malik Naveed, 38, and his guard, Mohammad Zareef, 42, were shot while riding in a car by at least two …

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Steeped in Martyrdom, Cubs of the Caliphate Groomed as Jihadist Legacy

July 6, 2017 | Business

They are known as the cubs of the caliphate, youngsters enlisted by the Islamic State, which views them as the generation that will conquer Baghdad, Jerusalem, Mecca and Rome.

The West and the Middle East communities from which they have been recruited see them as a grim threat, the deadly legacy of a murderous caliphate on the brink of military defeat.

As the terror group’s territory shrinks in the face of offensives on IS strongholds in Syria and Iraq, the militants have highlighted in a series of chilling videos in recent months what they hope will be in store for their enemies. The militants are counting on the revenge of the lion cubs, the child soldiers they have been enlisting in northern and eastern Syria and western Iraq, and grooming determinedly since Islamic State’s leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi proclaimed himself the emir of all Muslims in June 2014.

Steeped in a culture of martyrdom, the threat posed by the cubs � both to themselves, as well as others � is worrying de-radicalization experts, who fear Western governments are not giving enough thought about what to do with them.

Western governments are the most likely to come up with the resources, analysts say, needed to rehabilitate IS’s cubs. There is little in the works, though, being planned to shape or establish rehabilitation programs, according to rights groups and charities working to reintegrate child soldiers in other conflict zones.

Rehabilitating ‘cubs’

They say that when they raise the issue of the cubs, they are battling a prevalent attitude among Western officials that these child soldiers are different from those in other conflicts and maybe beyond rehabilitation.

It would be a terrible mistake to think that because someone was a cub for a year or two, they are lost forever – they can be saved and rehabilitated, says Mia Bloom, a Canadian academic, who is co-authoring a book on jihadist child soldiers.

Not only have Western governments not started to calculate what would be involved in a successful rehabilitation program, they don’t even want to consider that the four-year-old is not culpable, she argued. Of the cubs who are the sons and daughters of foreign fighters, Western governments often are trying to slam the door on them. In many cases they have canceled the passports, revoked citizenship, said Bloom.

“What we are seeing with many of the Western governments is a complete rejection of the children because they fear they could be potentially members of sleeper cells or time-bombs waiting to explode, she said.

Bloom worries that will be a self-fulfilling prophesy, if programs aren’t established quickly to start the long and expensive process to reintegrate them, which she insists is possible.

Experts point to the successes achieved by clinical psychologist Feriha Peracha, who has been overseeing a project partly funded by the Pakistani Army to de-radicalize and rehabilitate young Pakistani militants recruited by the Taliban.

When Peracha first got involved in rehabilitation efforts in Pakistan’s Swat Valley in 2009, she was terrified, fearing initially the radicalized youngsters could kill her at any moment. But she quickly began to sympathize with the boys, aged between eight and 16, who she saw were brainwashed, had been taught by rote the Koran in Arabic, and trained to be killers.

Deprogramming initiatives

Her deprogramming efforts have drawn wide praise since then.

“We have reintegrated 192 without any recidivism, said Peracha. She said the two most important aspects that have ensured success are maintaining monitoring up to five years after reintegration, and ensuring alternative life opportunities and goals for the boys.

Peracha says it can take six months to four years to reintegrate a young militant depending on the factors that pushed them into militancy. Teenagers take longer than pre-teens. Each student costs approximately $200 to $350 per month.

In Syria and Iraq, the challenge is even greater. The Islamic State has enlisted thousands of youngsters, some as young as four years old, in northern Syria and Iraq, indoctrinating them ideologically, and training them as suicide bombers, spies and as executioners.

And there has been no let-up in the effort. In March, the militants’ weekly online magazine, Al-Naba’ highlighted IS’s determination to continue to groom youngsters even in the face of battlefield losses.

If anything, there seems to be a greater urgency in the militants’ recruitment efforts. The high casualties IS has sustained partly explains the continued enlistment of kids.

In a video released last year by IS of the training of recruited pre-teens and teenagers in in Syria’s Al-Khayr province, the narrator concludes ominously, Even if we are all eradicated and no one survives, these cubs will carry the banner of jihad and will complete the journey.

Many cubs will survive the offensives currently underway against the terror group – 2,000 suspected cubs currently are in detention in Iraq. Rachel Taylor of Child Soldiers International, a nonprofit based in London, says throwing cubs into detention centers isn’t an answer.

Exploited children

Taylor says that doesn’t mean refraining from punishing those who are guilty of war crimes, but not all of them should be treated as terrorists. We need to recognize that they are children who have been exploited. Stigmatizing them can be as psychologically damaging, if not more so, than the trauma they underwent as child soldiers, she added.

They need education, jobs and a role; you have to offer them stable, productive alternatives to violence, otherwise you will add another cycle of violence, she warned.

Taylor disputes the idea that somehow the cubs of the caliphate are different from child soldiers in the Congo or Colombia. When it comes to recruitment, the drivers are the same, she argues. The ideology is secondary – the drivers are lack of security, desire for revenge, desire for a role, the need to find food, shelter and support and to seek material benefits, she said. The role of parents in recruitment is often crucial, she notes.

That certainly seems the case in Syria and Iraq. According to several studies, and from anecdotal information gathered by VOA from refugees since 2014, youngsters who joined IS were often coerced to do so in different ways, ranging from being cajoled by parents, to kidnappings from orphanages. Some parents were eager for at least one of their children to enlist because of the monthly payments IS paid the families of cubs; but others did so because they agreed with the terror group’s ideology.

The role of families in the recruitment complicates rehabilitation. The standard practice for reintegrating child soldiers is to reunite them with their families as quickly as possible; there are dangers, though, if the parents were complicit in the recruitment. One answer would be to require whole families to go through a rehabilitation program.

There is not a one-size-fit-all, cautioned the Canadian academic Bloom. We are going to need programs that are suited to every level of involvement – from those like the girls, who witnessed violence, to boys who have shot someone or cut off someone’s head or detonated an explosive device, she said.

Doing that while conflict rages will be impossible, de-radicalization experts say. Trying to do it even post-conflict will be a challenge, especially in wrecked communities, where families will be mourning the deaths of relatives amid an atmosphere of anger and grievance.

Source: Voice of America

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Steeped in Martyrdom, Cubs of the Caliphate Groomed as Jihadist Legacy

July 6, 2017 | Business

They are known as the cubs of the caliphate, youngsters enlisted by the Islamic State, which views them as the generation that will conquer Baghdad, Jerusalem, Mecca and Rome.

The West and the Middle East communities from which they have been recruited see them as a grim threat, the deadly legacy of a murderous caliphate on the brink of military defeat.

As the terror group’s territory shrinks in the face of offensives on IS strongholds in Syria and Iraq, the militants have highlighted in a series of chilling videos in recent months what they hope will be in store for their enemies. The militants are counting on the revenge of the lion cubs, the child soldiers they have been enlisting in northern and eastern Syria and western Iraq, and grooming determinedly since Islamic State’s leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi proclaimed himself the emir of all Muslims in June 2014.

Steeped in a culture of martyrdom, the threat posed by the cubs � both to themselves, as well as others � is worrying de-radicalization experts, who fear Western governments are not giving enough thought about what to do with them.

Western governments are the most likely to come up with the resources, analysts say, needed to rehabilitate IS’s cubs. There is little in the works, though, being planned to shape or establish rehabilitation programs, according to rights groups and charities working to reintegrate child soldiers in other conflict zones.

Rehabilitating ‘cubs’

They say that when they raise the issue of the cubs, they are battling a prevalent attitude among Western officials that these child soldiers are different from those in other conflicts and maybe beyond rehabilitation.

It would be a terrible mistake to think that because someone was a cub for a year or two, they are lost forever – they can be saved and rehabilitated, says Mia Bloom, a Canadian academic, who is co-authoring a book on jihadist child soldiers.

Not only have Western governments not started to calculate what would be involved in a successful rehabilitation program, they don’t even want to consider that the four-year-old is not culpable, she argued. Of the cubs who are the sons and daughters of foreign fighters, Western governments often are trying to slam the door on them. In many cases they have canceled the passports, revoked citizenship, said Bloom.

“What we are seeing with many of the Western governments is a complete rejection of the children because they fear they could be potentially members of sleeper cells or time-bombs waiting to explode, she said.

Bloom worries that will be a self-fulfilling prophesy, if programs aren’t established quickly to start the long and expensive process to reintegrate them, which she insists is possible.

Experts point to the successes achieved by clinical psychologist Feriha Peracha, who has been overseeing a project partly funded by the Pakistani Army to de-radicalize and rehabilitate young Pakistani militants recruited by the Taliban.

When Peracha first got involved in rehabilitation efforts in Pakistan’s Swat Valley in 2009, she was terrified, fearing initially the radicalized youngsters could kill her at any moment. But she quickly began to sympathize with the boys, aged between eight and 16, who she saw were brainwashed, had been taught by rote the Koran in Arabic, and trained to be killers.

Deprogramming initiatives

Her deprogramming efforts have drawn wide praise since then.

“We have reintegrated 192 without any recidivism, said Peracha. She said the two most important aspects that have ensured success are maintaining monitoring up to five years after reintegration, and ensuring alternative life opportunities and goals for the boys.

Peracha says it can take six months to four years to reintegrate a young militant depending on the factors that pushed them into militancy. Teenagers take longer than pre-teens. Each student costs approximately $200 to $350 per month.

In Syria and Iraq, the challenge is even greater. The Islamic State has enlisted thousands of youngsters, some as young as four years old, in northern Syria and Iraq, indoctrinating them ideologically, and training them as suicide bombers, spies and as executioners.

And there has been no let-up in the effort. In March, the militants’ weekly online magazine, Al-Naba’ highlighted IS’s determination to continue to groom youngsters even in the face of battlefield losses.

If anything, there seems to be a greater urgency in the militants’ recruitment efforts. The high casualties IS has sustained partly explains the continued enlistment of kids.

In a video released last year by IS of the training of recruited pre-teens and teenagers in in Syria’s Al-Khayr province, the narrator concludes ominously, Even if we are all eradicated and no one survives, these cubs will carry the banner of jihad and will complete the journey.

Many cubs will survive the offensives currently underway against the terror group – 2,000 suspected cubs currently are in detention in Iraq. Rachel Taylor of Child Soldiers International, a nonprofit based in London, says throwing cubs into detention centers isn’t an answer.

Exploited children

Taylor says that doesn’t mean refraining from punishing those who are guilty of war crimes, but not all of them should be treated as terrorists. We need to recognize that they are children who have been exploited. Stigmatizing them can be as psychologically damaging, if not more so, than the trauma they underwent as child soldiers, she added.

They need education, jobs and a role; you have to offer them stable, productive alternatives to violence, otherwise you will add another cycle of violence, she warned.

Taylor disputes the idea that somehow the cubs of the caliphate are different from child soldiers in the Congo or Colombia. When it comes to recruitment, the drivers are the same, she argues. The ideology is secondary – the drivers are lack of security, desire for revenge, desire for a role, the need to find food, shelter and support and to seek material benefits, she said. The role of parents in recruitment is often crucial, she notes.

That certainly seems the case in Syria and Iraq. According to several studies, and from anecdotal information gathered by VOA from refugees since 2014, youngsters who joined IS were often coerced to do so in different ways, ranging from being cajoled by parents, to kidnappings from orphanages. Some parents were eager for at least one of their children to enlist because of the monthly payments IS paid the families of cubs; but others did so because they agreed with the terror group’s ideology.

The role of families in the recruitment complicates rehabilitation. The standard practice for reintegrating child soldiers is to reunite them with their families as quickly as possible; there are dangers, though, if the parents were complicit in the recruitment. One answer would be to require whole families to go through a rehabilitation program.

There is not a one-size-fit-all, cautioned the Canadian academic Bloom. We are going to need programs that are suited to every level of involvement – from those like the girls, who witnessed violence, to boys who have shot someone or cut off someone’s head or detonated an explosive device, she said.

Doing that while conflict rages will be impossible, de-radicalization experts say. Trying to do it even post-conflict will be a challenge, especially in wrecked communities, where families will be mourning the deaths of relatives amid an atmosphere of anger and grievance.

Source: Voice of America

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At Least 11 Killed In Bus Accident In Pakistan’s Punjab Province

July 6, 2017 | General, Sports

At least 11 people were killed and 36 were injured in a collision between a passenger bus and a tractor in Pakistan’s southern Punjab Province on July 5, police said.The incident, caused by speeding, took place near Layyah city when the driver of the R…

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China, India Standoff Worsens Over Himalayan Plateau

July 6, 2017 | Education

BEIJING � China has insisted India withdraw its troops from a disputed Himalayan plateau before talks can take place to settle the most protracted standoff in recent years between the nuclear-armed neighbors, who fought a bloody frontier war 55 years ago.

India must pull back its troops as soon as possible as a precondition to demonstrate sincerity, foreign ministry spokesman Geng Shuang told reporters at a daily news briefing.

His comments came after weeks of saber-rattling in New Delhi and Beijing, as both sides talk up a potential clash bloodier than their 1962 war that left thousands dead.

Relations swiftly deteriorating

The standoff could spill over into the G-20 summit in Germany later this week where Chinese President Xi Jinping and his Indian counterpart Narendra Modi are expected to meet at a gathering of leaders from five emerging economies on the sidelines of the main event.

The monthlong standoff and unconfirmed reports of troop buildups on both sides of the border have also underscored the swiftly deteriorating relations between the two Asian rivals headed by assertive leaders with a nationalist bent.

China complained bitterly when Tibet’s spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama, who lives in exile in India, visited the contested Arunachal Pradesh region in April, which India said amounted to interference in its internal affairs.

China also appeared frustrated that India has refused to join its continentwide One Belt, One Road infrastructure initiative, which includes a key component in Pakistan, India’s archrival but one of China’s staunchest allies.

Meanwhile, India has fumed about China using its position at the United Nations to effectively stymie India’s efforts to gain permanent membership in the Security Council or label the Pakistani militant Masood Azhar a terrorist.

‘Fragile, volatile relationship’

Despite a litany of grievances on both sides, frequent clashes on the 3,500-kilometer (2,174-mile) shared border have been the most prominent irritant in efforts to build stable bilateral ties, said Zhang Li, an expert on China-India relations at Sichuan University.

The border clashes show how fragile and volatile the relationship can be, Zhang said, noting that the latest flare-up took place in an area relatively free of past trouble and not previously contested.

The dispute flared in June after Chinese teams began building a road on territory also claimed by Bhutan. Although China and Bhutan have been negotiating the precise border for decades without serious incident, the tiny Himalayan kingdom sought help this time from its longtime ally, India, which sent troops onto the plateau to stop the Chinese workers.

Since then, videos have emerged of Indian and Chinese soldiers blocking each other with their arms and physically jostling without coming to blows.

Sniping on both sides

Incensed with India’s involvement, China retaliated by closing a nearby mountain pass that Indian pilgrims use to reach Mount Kailash, a sacred Hindu and Buddhist site in Tibet. China’s foreign ministry also presented to reporters historical documents that it says prove China’s claims to the plateau.

That hasn’t stopped the two-way sniping. After Chinese officials said India should learn historic lessons from its humiliating defeat in the 1962 war, Indian Defense Minister Arun Jaitley responded that India in 2017 is different from India in 1962, in a reference to its improved military strength.

While Indian media have issued shrill warnings about Chinese expansionism, Chinese state media have also ramped up their bellicose rhetoric, with the nationalist tabloid Global Times warning Wednesday that Beijing would make no concessions.

Zhang, the Sichuan University professor, acknowledged the unusually tough talk from both sides but said the conduct of the two militaries and foreign ministries has been relatively restrained and within normal bounds.

Abhijnan Rej, a fellow at the Observer Research Foundation, a New Delhi-based think tank, said India needed to show resolve as China tries to pry away its traditional allies like Bhutan and assert itself as the region’s leader.

China has exhibited a larger pattern in the last two years and sees itself as an Asian hegemon, Rej said. You don’t become that by playing by the rules.

Doklam Plateau

Even though the Doklam Plateau is not part of Indian territory, New Delhi has been particularly sensitive to Chinese building activity in a region with strategic significance.

If linked by Chinese roads, Doklam could become a launching point for a Chinese attack on the vital Siliguri corridor, also known as the Chicken Neck, that connects India’s northeast with the rest of the country, Indian analysts say. Last month, India’s Ministry of Externals Affairs said Chinese actions in the area had serious security implications.

Aside from Doklam, the two countries have vast competing territorial claims. China claims about 90,000 square kilometers (35,000 square miles) in the Indian province of Arunachal Pradesh, referred to informally by some Chinese as Southern Tibet. India, meanwhile, says 38,000 square kilometers (15,000 square miles) of the Aksai Chin plateau belongs to it.

More than a dozen rounds of talks have failed to make substantial progress in the dispute, although there have been relatively few confrontations in recent years. India has also formally joined the Russian and Chinese-dominated Shanghai Cooperation Organization this year alongside Pakistan.

Former Indian Ambassador to Beijing C.V. Ranganathan said he was baffled by why the typical diplomatic channels that have smoothed over other flare-ups have not worked.

The fact that this has lasted so long is not a good sign, he said. India and China’s relationship has been on a downward trend recently and this in fact is yet another example.

Source: Voice of America

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