2017 December 04 : AsiaNet-Pakistan

Archive for December 4th, 2017

JTI Awarded Top Employer 2018 in Asia Pacific Region

December 4, 2017 | General

GENEVA, December 4, 2017/PRNewswire/ —Exceptional Employee Offerings Acknowledged for the fourth consecutive year JTI (Japan Tobacco International) has once again been recognized with the prestigious Top Employer certification in the Asia Pacific region for the fourth consecutive year. Along with the regional award, nine JTI offices and factories in eight countries – Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Malaysia, Russia, Singapore […]

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Board Meeting of Trust Securities and Brokerage Limited

December 4, 2017 | Board Meetings

Karachi, Trust Securities and Brokerage Limited informed Pakistan Stock Exchange that a meeting of Board of Directors of the Company will be held on December 11, 2017 at Karachi to consider change of two Directors of the Company and accord approval of the resignation of out-going Directors. The appointment of New Directors will also be considered and approved. Trust Securities and Brokerage Limited is a company incorporated in Pakistan on October 19, 1993. It is a Public Limited Company the foundations of which are laid under the Companies Ordinance, 1984. The company is engaged in providing brokerage and financial advisory services to the clients. It is also a TRE Certificate holder of the exchange. It is also engaged in shares brokerage, investments, consultancy and underwriting services. The registered office of the company is located in Lahore. The stocks of the company are quoted on the Karachi and Lahore Stock Exchange of Pakistan. The symbol “TSBL” is being used by the stock exchange for the shares of Trust Brokerage Limited.

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Board Meeting of Trust Securities and Brokerage Limited

December 4, 2017 | Board Meetings

Karachi, Trust Securities and Brokerage Limited informed Pakistan Stock Exchange that a meeting of Board of Directors of the Company will be held on December 11, 2017 at Karachi to consider change of two Directors of the Company and accord approval of the resignation of out-going Directors. The appointment of New Directors will also be considered and approved. Trust Securities and Brokerage Limited is a company incorporated in Pakistan on October 19, 1993. It is a Public Limited Company the foundations of which are laid under the Companies Ordinance, 1984. The company is engaged in providing brokerage and financial advisory services to the clients. It is also a TRE Certificate holder of the exchange. It is also engaged in shares brokerage, investments, consultancy and underwriting services. The registered office of the company is located in Lahore. The stocks of the company are quoted on the Karachi and Lahore Stock Exchange of Pakistan. The symbol “TSBL” is being used by the stock exchange for the shares of Trust Brokerage Limited.

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Board of directors meeting of Bank Alfalah Limited

December 4, 2017 | Board Meetings

Karachi, Bank Alfalah Limited informed Pakistan Stock Exchange that board of directors meeting of the company will be held on December 11, 2017 at Karachi. The agenda of the meeting will to consider the Annual Budget 2018 and other agenda items. Further, the company has declared the closed period from December 04, 2017 to December 12, 2017 Bank Alfalah Limited was incorporated as a public limited company on June 21, 1992. The foundations of the bank are laid under the Companies Ordinance 1984. The banking operations of the company commenced from November 1, 1997. The bank is owned and operated by the Abu Dhabi Group and does business through a network of over 500 branches in more than 170 cities in Pakistan. The bank has an international presence in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bahrain and a representative office in the UAE. The shares of the bank are quoted on the Karachi, Lahore and Islamabad stock Exchanges of Pakistan. The registered office of the company is located in Karachi. The core operations of the bank are providing financial solutions to consumers, corporations, institutions and governments through a broad spectrum of products and services, including corporate and investment banking, consumer banking and credit, commercial, SME, agri-finance, Islamic and asset financing. The symbol “BAFL” is being used by the stock exchanges for the shares of Bank Al-Falah Limited.

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Board of directors meeting of Bank Alfalah Limited

December 4, 2017 | Board Meetings

Karachi, Bank Alfalah Limited informed Pakistan Stock Exchange that board of directors meeting of the company will be held on December 11, 2017 at Karachi. The agenda of the meeting will to consider the Annual Budget 2018 and other agenda items. Further, the company has declared the closed period from December 04, 2017 to December 12, 2017 Bank Alfalah Limited was incorporated as a public limited company on June 21, 1992. The foundations of the bank are laid under the Companies Ordinance 1984. The banking operations of the company commenced from November 1, 1997. The bank is owned and operated by the Abu Dhabi Group and does business through a network of over 500 branches in more than 170 cities in Pakistan. The bank has an international presence in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bahrain and a representative office in the UAE. The shares of the bank are quoted on the Karachi, Lahore and Islamabad stock Exchanges of Pakistan. The registered office of the company is located in Karachi. The core operations of the bank are providing financial solutions to consumers, corporations, institutions and governments through a broad spectrum of products and services, including corporate and investment banking, consumer banking and credit, commercial, SME, agri-finance, Islamic and asset financing. The symbol “BAFL” is being used by the stock exchanges for the shares of Bank Al-Falah Limited.

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Gemalto Gives Google Cloud Platform Customers Flexible Encryption and Key Management Capabilities

December 4, 2017 | Education

Google customers can use Gemalto’s SafeNet Data Encryption Solutions to bring their own encryption keys to secure their sensitive data on the cloud Amsterdam, 4 December, 2017 – Gemalto (Euronext NL0000400653 GTO), the world leader in digital security, today announced it is providing Google Cloud Platform customers with the ability to manage and maintain full […]

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شركة جيمالتو تتيح لعملاء منصة سحابة جوجل إمكانية التشفير المرن وإدارة المفاتيح

December 4, 2017 | Education

الفرصة متاحة أمام عملاء جوجل لاستخدام حلول تشفير البيانات ““SafeNet من شركة جيمالتو لتأمين بياناتهم الحساسة الموجودة على السحابة دبي، الإمارات العربية المتحدة – 4 ديسمبر2017 – أعلنت شركة جيمالتو، الشركة الرائدة في مجال الأمن الرقمي (ومسجلة في بورصة يورورنكست تحت الرمز NL0000400653 GTO )، عن أنها تتيح لعملاء منصة جوجل السحابية إمكانية إدارة مفاتيح […]

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Pakistan PM: ‘Nobody Wants Peace in Afghanistan More Than Pakistan’

December 4, 2017 | Entertainment

KUWAIT CITY, KUWAIT Pakistani Prime Minister Shahid Khaqan Abbasi said Monday at the start of talks with visiting U.S. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis that Pakistan is committed to the war against terror.”Nobody wants peace in Afghanistan more than Paki…

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Mattis Visits Pakistan Says He Won’t ‘Prod’ the Government

December 4, 2017 | Legal & Politics

KUWAIT CITY, KUWAIT U.S. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis made a visit Monday to Pakistan where he said he did not plan to “prod” the government, but expected it to adhere to its promises to combat terrorism.Speaking aboard a military plane ahead of his…

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Mattis Tells Pakistan to ‘Redouble’ Efforts to Confront Militants, Terrorists

December 4, 2017 | Education

KUWAIT CITY, ISLAMABAD U.S. Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis urged Pakistan on Monday to redouble its efforts to confront militants and terrorists operating within the country, emphasizing “the vital role” Islamabad can play to work with Washington to facilitate a peace process in Afghanistan.

Mattis arrived in Pakistan on a day trip and went into meetings with Prime Minister Shahid Khaqan Abbasi and the military chief, General Qamar Javed Bajwa. Top Cabinet members and the country’s spy chief, as well as national security adviser, also attended.

Mattis came away from the visit “confident and optimistic,” according to a senior U.S. defense official who characterized the meetings as “straightforward” and “focused on rebuilding trust.”

“Rather than present a list of charges,” Mattis focused on finding common ground, the official said. “The secretary has too much respect for Pakistan’s military to believe they can’t or won’t” address U.S. concerns about militants, he added.

A U.S. statement issued after the talks said Mattis recognized Pakistan’s sacrifices in the war against terrorism and called for increased efforts toward regional stability and security.

“The Secretary emphasized the vital role that Pakistan can play in working with the United States and others to facilitate a peace process in Afghanistan that brings stability and security to the region,” it said.

U.S. and Afghan officials allege the Taliban and the Haqqani Network are using sanctuaries on Pakistani soil for orchestrating attacks on the Afghan side of the border.

‘Committed to its resolve’

Abbasi’s office also issued its own statement that quoted the prime minister as telling Mattis that counterterrorism operations have improved national security and Pakistan would continue the campaign to consolidate the gains it has achieved over the past four years.

“The Prime Minister reiterated that there are no safe heavens in Pakistan and the entire nation was committed to its resolve on eradicating terrorism once and for all in all its forms and manifestations,” it said.

Earlier, Abbasi, while opening the meeting with Mattis, said “nobody wants peace in Afghanistan more than Pakistan.” He added that the United States and Pakistan “share the same common objectives.”

Before his visit to Islamabad, Mattis said he did not plan to “prod” Pakistan, but expected it to adhere to its promises to combat terrorism. He also expressed hope for a collaborative approach.

“I believe that we [can] work hard on finding common ground and then we work together,” Mattis said.

In October, Mattis warned the United States is willing to work “one more time” with Pakistan before taking “whatever steps are necessary” to address its alleged support for militants.

Islamabad denies supporting militants, saying Washington is scapegoating Pakistan for its own failures in Afghanistan, where the United States remains in a stalemate after 16 years of war.

Tougher stance

Before Mattis’ visit, other Trump administration officials took a harder public stance on Pakistan.

Speaking at a defense forum Saturday, CIA Director Mike Pompeo said, “We are going to do everything we can to ensure that safe havens no longer exist,” if Pakistan does not heed the U.S. message on militants.

Since 2004, the CIA has conducted drone strikes � mostly against al-Qaida and Pakistani Taliban targets � in northwest Pakistan, near the border with Afghanistan.

The United States is considering expanding those strikes, along with several other measures, according to media reports.

Other options include downgrading Pakistan’s status as a major non-NATO ally or sanctioning individual Pakistani leaders suspected having ties with the Taliban.

But any kind of punitive action wouldn’t take place for at least a few weeks at minimum, predicts Michael Kugelman, a South Asia analyst with the Woodrow Wilson Center.

“I think [the administration] wants to give the Pakistanis a bit more time to see if they’re responding to the various demands the United States made of them when it comes to cracking down on terrorists,” said Kugelman.

One of the likelier U.S. responses, according to Kugelman, is expanding not only the geographic scope of the drone war, but also widening the type of targets the United States goes after.

“I think we could start seeing the U.S. trying to target more Haqqani Network and Afghan Taliban targets,” especially in the sparsely populated Baluchistan and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa provinces, he said.

The Trump administration has also threatened cut off aid to Pakistan. Since 2002, the United States has given over $33 billion in assistance to Pakistan. But the aid has already been cut sharply in recent years.

Pakistani leverage?

If ties were to deteriorate, the United States also has much to lose. Pakistan controls U.S. military supply routes to landlocked Afghanistan, and could close them down, as they did in 2011. The United States would also like Pakistan to scale back its nuclear modernization, improve ties with India, and stay engaged in the broader fight against Islamic militants.

But despite the risks, Michael O’Hanlon, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, warns Washington appears to be running out of patience.

“For many years we were trying to hold out hope that the Pakistanis would change their mind about Afghanistan and our role there,” he said. “But those kinds of hopes aren’t as prevalent anymore. And on balance, therefore, I think we are closer to using some of those tougher methods.”

Mattis, who is on a regional tour that also took him to Egypt, Jordan and Kuwait, wouldn’t elaborate on timing for any possible U.S. action.

However, following the meetings, a U.S. defense official warned: “Our patience is not unlimited.”

Source: Voice of America

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Mattis Tells Pakistan to ‘Redouble’ Efforts to Confront Militants, Terrorists

December 4, 2017 | Education

KUWAIT CITY, ISLAMABAD U.S. Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis urged Pakistan on Monday to redouble its efforts to confront militants and terrorists operating within the country, emphasizing “the vital role” Islamabad can play to work with Washington to facilitate a peace process in Afghanistan.

Mattis arrived in Pakistan on a day trip and went into meetings with Prime Minister Shahid Khaqan Abbasi and the military chief, General Qamar Javed Bajwa. Top Cabinet members and the country’s spy chief, as well as national security adviser, also attended.

Mattis came away from the visit “confident and optimistic,” according to a senior U.S. defense official who characterized the meetings as “straightforward” and “focused on rebuilding trust.”

“Rather than present a list of charges,” Mattis focused on finding common ground, the official said. “The secretary has too much respect for Pakistan’s military to believe they can’t or won’t” address U.S. concerns about militants, he added.

A U.S. statement issued after the talks said Mattis recognized Pakistan’s sacrifices in the war against terrorism and called for increased efforts toward regional stability and security.

“The Secretary emphasized the vital role that Pakistan can play in working with the United States and others to facilitate a peace process in Afghanistan that brings stability and security to the region,” it said.

U.S. and Afghan officials allege the Taliban and the Haqqani Network are using sanctuaries on Pakistani soil for orchestrating attacks on the Afghan side of the border.

‘Committed to its resolve’

Abbasi’s office also issued its own statement that quoted the prime minister as telling Mattis that counterterrorism operations have improved national security and Pakistan would continue the campaign to consolidate the gains it has achieved over the past four years.

“The Prime Minister reiterated that there are no safe heavens in Pakistan and the entire nation was committed to its resolve on eradicating terrorism once and for all in all its forms and manifestations,” it said.

Earlier, Abbasi, while opening the meeting with Mattis, said “nobody wants peace in Afghanistan more than Pakistan.” He added that the United States and Pakistan “share the same common objectives.”

Before his visit to Islamabad, Mattis said he did not plan to “prod” Pakistan, but expected it to adhere to its promises to combat terrorism. He also expressed hope for a collaborative approach.

“I believe that we [can] work hard on finding common ground and then we work together,” Mattis said.

In October, Mattis warned the United States is willing to work “one more time” with Pakistan before taking “whatever steps are necessary” to address its alleged support for militants.

Islamabad denies supporting militants, saying Washington is scapegoating Pakistan for its own failures in Afghanistan, where the United States remains in a stalemate after 16 years of war.

Tougher stance

Before Mattis’ visit, other Trump administration officials took a harder public stance on Pakistan.

Speaking at a defense forum Saturday, CIA Director Mike Pompeo said, “We are going to do everything we can to ensure that safe havens no longer exist,” if Pakistan does not heed the U.S. message on militants.

Since 2004, the CIA has conducted drone strikes � mostly against al-Qaida and Pakistani Taliban targets � in northwest Pakistan, near the border with Afghanistan.

The United States is considering expanding those strikes, along with several other measures, according to media reports.

Other options include downgrading Pakistan’s status as a major non-NATO ally or sanctioning individual Pakistani leaders suspected having ties with the Taliban.

But any kind of punitive action wouldn’t take place for at least a few weeks at minimum, predicts Michael Kugelman, a South Asia analyst with the Woodrow Wilson Center.

“I think [the administration] wants to give the Pakistanis a bit more time to see if they’re responding to the various demands the United States made of them when it comes to cracking down on terrorists,” said Kugelman.

One of the likelier U.S. responses, according to Kugelman, is expanding not only the geographic scope of the drone war, but also widening the type of targets the United States goes after.

“I think we could start seeing the U.S. trying to target more Haqqani Network and Afghan Taliban targets,” especially in the sparsely populated Baluchistan and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa provinces, he said.

The Trump administration has also threatened cut off aid to Pakistan. Since 2002, the United States has given over $33 billion in assistance to Pakistan. But the aid has already been cut sharply in recent years.

Pakistani leverage?

If ties were to deteriorate, the United States also has much to lose. Pakistan controls U.S. military supply routes to landlocked Afghanistan, and could close them down, as they did in 2011. The United States would also like Pakistan to scale back its nuclear modernization, improve ties with India, and stay engaged in the broader fight against Islamic militants.

But despite the risks, Michael O’Hanlon, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, warns Washington appears to be running out of patience.

“For many years we were trying to hold out hope that the Pakistanis would change their mind about Afghanistan and our role there,” he said. “But those kinds of hopes aren’t as prevalent anymore. And on balance, therefore, I think we are closer to using some of those tougher methods.”

Mattis, who is on a regional tour that also took him to Egypt, Jordan and Kuwait, wouldn’t elaborate on timing for any possible U.S. action.

However, following the meetings, a U.S. defense official warned: “Our patience is not unlimited.”

Source: Voice of America

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Mattis’ Softer Approach Is Latest Effort to Foster Change in Pakistan

December 4, 2017 | Business

President Donald Trump’s policy of pressuring Islamabad to rout terrorists seems to have had little effect, adding to the need for U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis’ to mend badly frayed ties, analysts say.

Mattis met Monday with Pakistan’s prime minister, defense minister and army chief of staff during his brief stop. The repeated theme was to find common ground to foster peace in neighboring Afghanistan to benefit the entire South Asian region.

But the response from Pakistan was little changed: it would benefit most from stability in Afghanistan, it doesn’t harbor terror organizations, and it has sacrificed heavily supporting the U.S. war on terrorism. That leaves the question of whether Pakistan is willing to risk a break in its relationship with Washington and an end to the flow of the billions of dollars in U.S. aid.

I think the time-delaying tactics are still in play, Dr. Ijaz Khattak, a professor at the University of Peshawar’s Department of International Relations, told VOA Deewa. I believe this time these talks will be a bit unusual as some progress will come out, whether for good or bad. I don’t think things can move in ambiguity anymore.

‘Miscreants’ blamed

Gen. Qamar Javed Bajwa, Pakistan army’s chief of staff, claimed success in Pakistan’s fight against terror and said only miscreants are left.

We have eliminated safe havens from Pakistan’s soil but are prepared to look into the possibility of miscreants exploiting Pakistan’s hospitality to the Afghan refugees to the detriment of our Afghan brothers, an army statement quoted Bajwa as saying after meeting with Mattis.

Bharat Gopalaswamy, director of the Atlantic Council’s South Asia Program, said that while Afghanistan feels a sense of urgency in fighting the resurgent Taliban and Islamic State’s new presence, Pakistan may not feel as serious about the situation because it has its own priorities.

Focus on India

The country has been leaning increasingly toward conservatism and religious intolerance, and the powerful military’s focus has always been on rival India.

Trump’s approach provides India with a stronger role to play in the region, and New Delhi has eased the pressure that Pakistan has exerted on landlocked Afghanistan’s international trade by providing alternative delivery routes.

Gopalaswamy told the VOA Urdu show View 360 that Pakistan’s claims it is fighting extremism have been undercut by the release from house arrest of Islamist leader Hafiz Saeed, who has been accused of masterminding terrorist attacks in India.

Saeed said Sunday that his Jamaat-ud-Dawa group, which has been designated a terrorist group by the U.S., plans to run in next year’s elections.

This is the right time to enter the country’s politics and highlight the Kashmir cause, Saeed told reporters in Lahore.

Mattis’ softer approach in Islamabad contrasts with recent comments by other U.S. officials.

‘Clear demands’

Last week, Gen. John Nicholson, head of U.S. forces in Afghanistan, said Islamabad had not carried out the clear demands made by Washington. CIA director Mike Pompeo added Saturday: We are going to do everything we can to ensure that safe havens no longer exist, if Pakistan does not heed the U.S. message on militants.

Since 2004, the CIA has conducted drone strikes � mostly against al-Qaida and Pakistani Taliban targets � in northwest Pakistan, near the border with Afghanistan.

The United States is considering expanding those strikes, along with several other measures, according to media reports.

Source: Voice of America

Read More